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CTD deployment in False Bay
False Bay Project
The False Bay Project is a collaborative project between the Marine Research Institute at the University of Cape Town (UCT) through the Oceanography department and the Institute of Maritime Technology through the South African Navy (IMT). The...
Agulhas Current
Marine Remote Sensing
Satellite products are a major part of ocean observation and is one of the core research areas. The department is also one of the major partners in the Marine Remote Sensing Unit which aims to provide for the operational and research remote sensing...
SA Agulhas
SAMOC
Bridging the Atlantic - The world’s oceans are undergoing significant changes – seen in indicators such as temperature and salinity. Dr Isabelle Ansorge PI of SAMOC-SA explains how South African scientists and students from the Oceanography Dept....

News

Monday, 27 June 2016

Associate Professor Isabelle Ansorge has been appointed as the new Head of the Department of Oceanography for a five-year term commencing 1 January, 2016.

 

Publication Date:
Thursday, January 28, 2016 - 12:30
Life aboard the polar research vessel SA Agulhas II was an education on its own, according to this report by five ocean climate dynamics master's students who headed into the frigid Southern Ocean in August.
Publication Date:
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 12:15

The training course is organized by the Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre (OA-ICC) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and is hosted by the University of Cape Town and the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) of South Africa.

The purpose of the course is to train early-career scientists and researchers from IAEA African Member States entering the ocean acidification field, with the goal to assist them in becoming able to measure ocean acidification and to set up pertinent experiments, avoiding typical pitfalls and ensuring comparability with other studies. Expected outputs also include increased networking among scientists working on ocean acidification in Africa.

Publication Date:
Thursday, August 27, 2015 - 09:30

In order to predict changing climate patterns in the coming years and decades, scientists need to understand the various interactions that take place within what is referred to as the earth system. This means understanding and predicting the interactions between atmosphere, land surface, ocean and sea ice, - known as the physical system - as well as the biogeochemical processes, such as the carbon cycle, which interact with this physical system. Today scientists can sucessfully model this system, but it entails an immense level of computing power. This is why the Department of Oceanography is partnering with UCT eResearch to use high performance computing (HPC) facilities for ocean and climate modelling.

Publication Date:
Thursday, August 27, 2015 - 09:00

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